India 2015

In collaboration with UCDVO, the foundation sent a 3D printing kit to Vijayawada, India in partnership with the local NGO Care and Share during the summer of 2015.  Care and Share run two ‘Children’s Villages’ for over one thousand children orphaned or abandoned as a result of HIV/AIDS and extreme poverty. The kit was supported by a student Engineer, Paul Croizer, who worked with locals to test the printers on location, and was virtually supported and managed from Ireland by Shane Keaveney and Colin Keogh.  A range of educational supports for other volunteers, assitive devices, and small children's toys were produced.  The locals embraced the technology, and  the project aims to continue the colaboration. 



Rwanda 2016

A major aspect of the work of the foundation is public engagement through informal workshops and seminars, teaching technology to none experts and experts alike. The foundation has been engaged in a large number of such events since its inception but listed is a number of photos to represent these.  

The Rapid Foundation supported an overseas trip during June 2016 ,when a group of 8 female engineering students from University of Glasgow’s FemEng took up residence at the University of Rwanda in Kigali to combine their skills and innovation with a team of Rwandan counterparts. The common goals were: to encourage, educate and inspire Rwanda’s female STEM students of the future.

FemEng in Rwanda, which has received backing from a number of high profile engineering companies including Global Highland, CH2M, Western Ferries and STAR Refrigeration, will involve the delivery of STEM-based workshops (with resources donated from Dyson, the Rapid Foundation and the UoG Department of Biomedical Engineering) to high school students with the intention of fostering an interest in this field among participants.

Uganda 2015

Also during the summer of 2015 another engineer, Emmet Walsh, took the technology to Kisiizi Hospital in southwest Uganda on a project which sent Physiotherapists to help at the hospital. The technology was proven during both trips, with the production of educational toys, assistive braces and custom teaching aids.The project sent two engineers overseas to test the concept during the summer of 2015. The technology was trialed in Vijayawada, India by Paul Crozier, in partnership with the NGO Care and Share, who run two ‘Children’s Villages’ for over one thousand orphaned or abandoned children, as a result of HIV/AIDS and extreme poverty. Another engineer, Emmet Walsh, took the technology to Kisiizi Hospital, southwest Uganda on a project which sent Physiotherapists to help at the hospital. The technology was proven during both trips, with the production of educational toys, assistive braces and custom teaching aids.

Public Workshops and Seminars